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them education made this new economy. so it wasn't that the government was spending. government and intentionally in a sense was restructuring the economy making it prepared for the post war period. as also an interesting book in the period in the 30's the government was actually giving a lot of investment and that increased productivity and that after the war it increased their returns to the investment in the private sector and so it created a context that was done during the war that said we had public spending provided a context with higher returns. this is an important point. in general, we've got this notion that the sector is complementary to the private investment. i mean, there is a lot of things that people will do if they believe there is an adequate transportation network if they believe that they are going to have skilled workers available because they have had good education to be sure. >> i tend to strip down to the minimal story and would be just about the debt and of course what we are doing right now we have states and government cancelling infrastructure proje
to establish a democracy and rights of all individuals. dagen: kc mcfarland. connell: $5 billion in education cuts, if there is no debt deal with another part of this we will take up with union leader randy wine garden in a few minutes. dagen: john boehner meeting with the treasury secretary right now about trying to broker some deal. we will hear from john maynard this hour and you can catch it here. look at the oil market again, tensions rising in the least and the price of oil rising as well, $80 a barrel. you know how painf heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. dagen: you want to make money? that guy is not connell mcshane. [talking over each other] connell: rather make money while we sleep which putting somebody to sleep -- charles: i like temperature edict. the housing come back, everyone associated with housing does very well except the mattresses, and the stock is extremely % oversold an
college education of i appeared in public with any group of african-americans. that was coercive pressure. it was definitely emotional blackmail and extremely unpleasant. where should government and law stepping? certainly it should step in where physical and/or sexual abuse is going on which is very often. then it is much tougher to talk about emotional coercion and i actually think as bad as my father's practices where it would not have been right for government to remove custody or do something else like that where religious mandate are concerned, intervention would be justified where the behavior either constitutes gross risk to bodily health and safety, witness children being forgiven to have a life-saving blood transfusion or impairs some major bodily function in. i think female genital mutilation practiced on myers should be illegal if it impair sexual pleasure or other bodily functions. the symbolic kirkwood be a different story. christian science believe children should not be taken to the doctor when they are ill, has also been litigated successfully. some forms of so-called alt
the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to
wanted to be with his son but he also wanted to expose him to a european education and to the world of international affairs, and they went to stay with benjamin franklin, and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside of paris at the time coming and john quincy, john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. and within several months he was speaking french fluently. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15, he could speak four languages fluently. he'd already studied classical, latin and greek, he could write latin and greek. he was gifted in foreign languages that when a family friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spend
to utilize their talents and the education they have received is to give them a legal status. >> suarez: the bill would to grant legal residence for those who pursue higher education or serve the u.s. military. unlike the "dream act," which failed to get through congress, the "achieve act" would not provide a path to full citizenship. and that is a sticking point for most democrats. new jersey senator bob menendez: >> they call it the achieve act. the problem with the achieve act is that it does not achieve the dream of the young people who aspire to fully participate in american life. who only know one flag that they pledge allegiance to, that is the flag of the united states. >> suarez: still, senator kyl said tuesday, the republican bill can be a first step toward broader measures. >> it will begin the discussion. and it may be that it will lead to a series of smaller steps next year rather than comprehensive reform. on the other hand i suspect that the president and others may want to put comprehensive reform on the table. but either way i think focusing on certain specific issues l
the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can still invest in things like education and training in science and research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you. we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this should not be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and congressional campaigns across the country. a clear majority of americans -- not just democrats, but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents, agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does not hurt the economy and middle-class families. i am glad to see you have been reading the papers lately -- more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea we should have a balanced approach. both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle-class families. let's begin our work with what we agree. the senate has passed a bill that keeps income-tax is from going up on the middle-class families. democrats in the house are willing to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well, i
to cut is the defense department. >> education would be cut by $2.3 billion. medicare payments to hospitals would be slashed by 5.6 billion. and custom and border patrol would lose $823 million. >> the point is to make it painful so they want to cut with a scalpel than a m machete. but it's not clear they will. >> bret: please join chris wallace for "fox news sunday" this weekend. he will have an exclusive interview with house speaker john boehner on the fiscal cliff negotiations. chris will talk to tim geithner. a "fox news sunday" you do not want to miss. check your local listings. consumer spending was down .2 of a percentage point in october. the dow finished ahead. the nasdaq lost two. europe's economy remains in the tank. 17 euro zone countries have a combined unemployment rate of 11.7%. that is the highest since the introduction of the common currency in 1999. 18.7 million people are out of work for the euro zone. pain and greece have jobless rates of more than 25%. back at home, the question of who will be the nation's top diplomat in president obama's second term conti
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
, the left will find little things about texas. they'll say terrible in education. nobody's health care is covered. >> listen, if we were terrible -- >> and health care. >> -- but why would all the businesses copt to -- >> that's what they'll say. there's all the problems with texas. it's a horrible place. and nobody's covered by health insurance. the other knock is that i guess a lot of the business development is -- i don't know, what do they say, you've got these grants you give to private corporations. cronyism capitalism? >> we are competitive. >> they point to something and say what is it, federal, state grants to companies. >> it's called competition. >> is it crony capitalism? >> in the real world that's how you compete, you compete for those businesses. listen rick scott in florida is a competitor, bobby jindal, susan martinez, they are all competing for those businesses. if you want to sit there -- i'll give you a good example. i think the martin o'malley, former -- or still -- former dn -- >> he's in virginia now, right? >> no. i think he's up in maryland. >> yeah, yeah, yeah
the environmentalist thought all the way. she said this is a movie that could educate children about the and the dangers of not paying attention to what going on in the local universe. so i think the studio we are fortunate to be recipient does. i would tell you that chris a letdown. was an inspiration for bringing that to life. as you said it's been around a long time with that those of us making dr. seuss films out of his books frankly never thought it doing this movie. so we were smart enough to get in business with chris undistributed. but no one up to that time ever thought of that and the cat in the hat. we did the grinch. >> we've all found ways to do, whether it be television or movies, dr. seuss related projects and on the spot to do the lorax. as environmentally conscious as we are, i don't think any of us had the inspiration to do it. >> if there's any others coming, the leader sees this very political. governor, environmental issues are one with it despite hollywood's best effort, people who want to regulate carbon emissions are basically losing the war of public opinion
't to educate children. >> this is the problem with collective bargaining rates. give us benefits, don't just touch our collective bargaining rights. no one wants to take anybody's rights, the right to bargain or negotiate anything, but it means the right to veto changes to benefits. we saw it in wisconsin. that's why scott walker had to take on collective bargaining rights first, make the changes to the benefits, because you saw this play out in school districts, where walker's reforms took effect, they were able to balance the budget, make changes to healthcare plans, like a $10k10 copay, and make people may into their retirement funds. some schools locked into the bargaining agreements before the walker law took effect and kept on going. maybe it wasn't plastic surgery, but you're seeing teachers getting fired instead of making benefit reductions. >> greta: it isn't just plastic surgery, but it's airline travel, expensive hotels, limousine. i mean, this is quite a school district to work for. >> and it was $9 million for plastic surgery a few years ago. by the way, there is no copay. i mea
foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! i'm going to have breakfast. come on in! what do you usually have for breakfast? good morning, mom! - good morning, daniel. hi, neighbor. now, for breakfast, you can choose hot o
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
to the education budget. like the queues outside employment offices, protests are also becoming more common. >> the eurozone may be having problems, but german exports are surging. in the third quarter, they went up 3.6% over the same time last year. >> that is mainly because german companies have been selling more goods to countries outside the eurozone. >> times are tough for countries like spain and portugal. the economic downturn in southern europe meant that manufacturers saw their exports to some countries shrank more than 10% year-on-year, but growing demand from overseas more than balanced out the losses on the european market. the total value of exports within the european union dropped by just under 1%, but business was booming in the united states, up 26%. that rise outstripped even the increase seen from china. german cars especially remained popular overseas. i of german exports continue to sell at this rate, they could reach a record 1.1 billion euros for 2012. >> how did companies react to the export news, and what does that mean for investors? our correspondence sent us this
more spending on education and health care lessen spending on weapon systems. that's kind of the big picture. and whether it's nurture or nature, who cares. the idea is that women really need to be at the table and we need to be at the table in large enough numbers that the perspective that women do bring to the table will be heard and will have an impact. >> on the surface, it's hard to disagree with that. but in practice i'm wondering if it's that easy. obviously the idea is to get the best person possible and i'm wondering if it's realistic when you factor in who actually wants to be in public service, who can get confirmed, sort of who is in that pipeline. are there enough women even in the pipeline at this point? >> i don't think there's any question that there's enough women in the pipeline. you know, there are just so many women out there and we may not know their names, you and i. the public may not know their names but clearly women have been entering the pipeline since the 1970s. there are highly competent excellent public servants that are out there and whether they are kn
that work. but ultimately it is about providing greater opportunity, greater education, greater economics, the jobs and growth to a population so that they can have a real stake in their society and can be partners with their government. i assume part of your question is aimed at the whole legalization issue. i think this is an ongoing debate. we are formulating our own response to the votes of two of our states, as you know, and what that means for the federal system, the federal laws and law enforcement. i respect those in the region who believe strongly that that would end the problem. i am not convinced of that, just speaking personally. i think, when you have a ruthless and vicious people who have made money one way and are somehow blocked, they will figure out another way. they will do kidnapping. they will do extortion. there will suborn officials and takeover swaths of territory that they will govern and terrorize people in. so i don't think that is the answer. whether there is some movement that can be discussed, i think it will have to be a topic for the future for us. >> thank
regularly played educational games with the boys in her nursery. and was actively involved in drop-offs and pickups at a day school in london. >> that was not okay with diana. >> reporter: in later years, william and harry would call diana, quite simply, the best mother in the world. those are some big maternal shoes to fill. but royal watchers predict kate is up to the challenge. >> i think william and kate's parenting styles may be similar to what diana did. and i think william and kate are going to follow that model, to do everything they can to ensure as normal a childhood as possible. but at the same time, educating their child for the future roles. >> i know it's a little early. but names are already being floated out there. and they may not surprise you. for a girl, we're hearing elizabeth. and for boys, charles or edward. and, yes. british bookies are in on the act. 6-1 odds that the royal baby is a redhead. josh? >> i'll take those odds. we'll be right back with you. >>> and ahead here, gold medalist gabrielle douglas here live. why she almost quit gymnastics just months b
for right now, and when to give our children the kind of education they need. i went to lead the world in research, technology, and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads, bridges, and their schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] >> on this last point, you probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deadlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. this is not some run-of-the-mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make that are going to have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our ultimate goal, our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we'v
. that is deviating away from what the real problems in education are. if you know that finland has the number one school system in the world and part of that process is making the standards so rigorous and they only the best of the best and same time they pay significantly more for teachers and once they earned that title. they earned complete autonomy over the class roommate. part of the problem we have so much regulation and mandates and we are dictated to how to teach in our classrooms. what is the point in making standards when we don't have the option to use professional judgment as it am is. >> steve: thank you very much for joining us on the wednesday morning from beautiful orlando, florida. thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, bu
the american people to go along with and probably needs to be more of an education process to say look at the numbers, here are the numbers. we haven't heard that. >> i think that's right. remember, we do elect representatives of the people. they should understand it. when you are running at a trillion dollar plus deficit every year and have $16 trillion worth of debt, it is 100% of gdp, that's a signal we have to do something. so i wouldn't expect all the american people that haven't had much exposure to this stuff to be fully cognizant. i hope the representatives are. >> but do you have people that say there is not a problem here. some -- like paul krugman who is a nobel prize-winning economist knows more than people on the street were doing this, he says you shouldn't be doing this at this point. >> i think that paul krugman is -- remarkable record of being wrong a lot of times. and -- i know that he has been -- nobel laureate and i won't be. but i think there's -- any serious person recognizes there is a problem here and we have to do something about it. >> how come we are still no
that storm. it actually created jobs. and when it comes to our schools, we're not investing in education so that tomorrow we could be innovative to create new innovative platforms that could weather the next one if there is to be one. so we could learn from what's happening now to protect us in the future and that is education and investing in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and schools. >> there's speculation that you'll be doing a tv show to find the next steve jobs or the next bill gates for an example. you can really find the bill gates through a television program? >> you can find the next bill gates through a competition. whether the competition happens online, in a fair, on tv is not important. but the competition is important. the challenge and the ob kestac and tools is important. >> you talk a lot about fashion and technology and incorporating the two together and there seems like there's a lot of focus on that. >> like that scarf you have, it's nice. but other than keeping your neck warm it doesn't do anything else for you. and in this day and age, it can do a lot m
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
employees it's not just about getting more education. too many people believe that will solve this. it's about getting a voice restoring democracy the money in politics, all kinds of issues that are about what stake do we each have in this country it can't just be about the 1%. >> that sounds like value based bargaining to me. that's larry cohen so grateful to you for coming inside the war room. >> always a pleasure. great work. >> all right, thanks. >> up next, if you're a casual observer of the media you're probably thinks that hostess's problems of a result of a bunch of no good greedy bakers. there are considerable gaps in that narrative and we're going to fill them in like a cream-filled treat. that's next, and we'll be right back. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. so check out the web site. just google elizabeth warren. i think i want to write her a check plyself. i would really love to see her join the rank
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ ♪ >> bob: a lot of you guys out there don't have any idea at the break, we found out what kind of man that kimberly likes. would you guys stop it? it's my one more thing. sorry. if you ever get a traffic ticket? you know how it feels when you see a light behind you. you have a sinking stomach and know it will cost you money. there are ways to get out of it. expoliceman wrote a book about this. he suggested -- write a book about, this i don't know. but he suggested that women can cry. the police may be sympathetic about that. man cries he is locked up. woman can show a little leg for example. >> kimberly: that works. >> bob: yeah. >> eric: money doe man does it,e gets locked up. >> bob: and cries. is there -- have you got count of a traffic ticket that way? >> kimberly: of course. i tend to sometimes drive fast. >> bob: i bet you do. >> kimberly: i love fast cars. i'm charming. sweet. the only time i got nailed was by a female offi
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> let's return to syria now. months of civil war taking a terrible toll on families. especially those living along the frontlines. people who don't have enough money to get away. in a piece you'll only see on cnn, our arwa damon caught up with families who have just returned to the hard-hit city of aleppo. >> reporter: they are home again, but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about one-third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back only to find out that these streets are now on the frontlines. if the regime can retake, it can cut off the main artery for
's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. our tough call this morning, there's no evidence coming to light in the trayvon martin investigation. there's a picture, new in-color picture of second-degree murder suspect george zimmerman, released by his attorney. it was reportedly taken by a police officer the night that zimmerman shot and killed trayvon martin. the picture itself is not new. the fact that it's a high resolution color photo is. we've seen black and white versions. to what degree does this help george zimmerman's case? does it change the case? >> obviously we're not in the legal process, so we don't know all the details. but i don't think it really tells you that much. it doesn't tell you at what point any injuries were sustained and what was going on when they were. clearly there was an altercation, which we always knew that. >> i'm a nonpracticing lawyer. >> you always do the denials first. i just want to say, this is not my client. then you launch into -- but if you see a guy's b
to the problem is for americans to become educated on how to cut spending. how you eliminate the tax deductions and expand the tax base so that you can increase the revenue without punishing segment of society. that doesn't it in the simp sob cartoon. they couldn't articulate that in a comical way. we are run by liberals who never spent a dollar they couldn't spend twice. obama could be a great foreign policy president if he pretended the enemies are rich americans. >> bob: you don't think there is waste in defense? >> greg: absolutely. i do think there is a waste of defense. >> dana: the waste in defense, climate change programs that they have to do. >> eric: greg pointed out things that are important. listen to the genius, howard dean. >> the only problem, truth is everybody needs to pay more taxes, not just the rich. >> that is not harasssy, that is honesty. honest moment for the first time. >> bob: can you tell us 30 seconds to tell us how to get the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out
anything into that or is that -- >> again i will liken it to there are plenty of people far more educated on this than i but from a negotiation standpoint i think again it is a lot about posturing. sending out your feelers. melissa: right. >> and seeing what the other side's response is to that and kind of figuring out what's the quasi-middle kbround. melissa: yeah. >> that is what the president is doing here, saying this isn't in the spirit what we're trying to accomplish. melissa: right. >> but for the president from what i can see, getting this behind him and getting this settled starts the next term of his presidency. melissa: so if you were advising him what would you tell him to do next in order to win this? how many days would you want him to wait? how tough would you want him to come back with a counter proposal or no counter proposal at all from pure negotiating? >> the interesting part, i think this does play in business --. melissa: oh, sure. >> we're in the midst of the holiday season. i don't know when congress shuts down for the year but that's coming. melissa: right. they h
you don't start a family. maybe you don't get married. all put on hold. and education you probably could not afford to begin with. >> you might not have been able to afford. but in all of the government has six different options to help the government to the debt, the longer you are in that debt the longer you delay the kinds of things you just talked about. gerri: us talk about that. the big conversation about a student loan debt in this country is is this going to be the next big government bailout? >> i called. we did an interview with laura and asher, president of the institute for college access and success. i kept saying, we have a 11% delinquent on student loans. does the government need to be there to help bail out? that is the question. she said seriously, no. there are six options for the 85% to the federal government. the question is the 15%, privately funded loans. you cannot defer and the 11% delinquency rate is far worse because a lot of those are not even on the books at. deferred. in some kind of forbearance. you don't register just yet. the 15% to 150 billion, thos
a big difference. so our people are looking at it, we're helping them, we're educating them, but i think decisions are going to be held on how we're going to handle it until after all the rules have been released. >> it would make a big difference because you have so many seasonal workers for 90 days versus the year? >> yeah, just overall cost. as you look at the turnover and all the rest of it, it's going to make some difference to us. there's a 30-hour limit, but there's been some discussion as to whether or not that could be 35. 35 would clearly be better. so i mean, there's just a lot of these rules that are yet to be written and i think they're going to have a big impact on how people are going to approach it. >> so, patrick, let me try to take this from a difference direction from a democratic perspective. i'm not trying to be difficult. but there are two ways to look at the mandate that goes with the employees. one s a burden on business. the other is it's an opportunity for business to attract and keep employees, particularly in seasonal jobs that are difficult to fill. is there
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways, one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would've normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never question what he would've done. never ask the question what he would do, to just do what's right. >> brian williams' conversation w
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ >>> victory for palestinians. the u.n. general assembly voted in favor of palestinian state hood. we want to show you the wild celebrations going on right now. this is the west bank. after the u.n. overwhelmingly gave the palestinians something they have wanted for years and the vote was pretty overwhelming. 138 countries in favor. it was a shellacking for those against it. the resolution passed against the will of the united states, israel, canada and six other nations. here's u.n. ambassador susan rice after the vote. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. >> now, the vote gives the palestinians a higher profile at the u.n. and more importan
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show her, tom. huh? you should see november! oh, yeah? giving you more. now that's progressive. call or click today. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit al
exaggerated at least i think his father behaved disgracefully. he had an expensive oxford education but purposefully denied it to young winston. >> purposefully, for what reason. >> partly money. he was very conscious of the expense of sending winston to oxford. he suggested that the army was a more suitable career and then tried to bargain with him not to go to the cavalry, that might be too expensive there. that wasn't all together an easy relationship. >> but he sold to to winston churchill by saying you can be a great man of the army. >> he did. he tried to. >> he later discovered that he really was too stupid to go to the bar. he was very disappointed, that he thought his father thought he was, you know, was going to be successing -- --. >> rose: found out his father thought he was too stupid. >> his father was dismissive. >> horrid to him. >> winston always wanted his father's affection. even a poignant story late in his life after the second world war where he had had all these accomplishments where winston has this supposedly dream moment where his father comes back and wins
. this process went on and on and did not progress at all. it was an education for people who were not steeped in the budget minutia the way senators were, but there was a real progress. we then went out to andrews and if anything the situation was worse. i have my access from the andrews summit, which i did not realize i had until they cleared out so they could put a new roof on because of sandy. they said, what are you saving the stuff for? i thought, this is what i am saving it for. my number is 108. i was not a lowest ranking person there. it was a room where food was consumed, but there was a whole lot of staffing and it went on and on until 2:00 at night sometimes. very little happened in the way of progress. until the much smaller group, the 8 people, largely without staff met in speaker foley's offices. there was an agreement reached which, as was pointed out, did not pass the hurdle but got halfway down the track and was a symbol of progress. that progress in part was the result of miss judgment on the part of some important players. i would say, senator byrd was convinced that the ca
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> welcome back. it's a performance enhancing trick called window dressing used by managers to boost their yearly returns. joining us to protect your money and the risk, understanding the risk better, is ronn ensana. good to see you. what exactly is window dressing? let's get right to the source of this issue. we see it every year. explain it. >> if depends. we've been doing this for 28 years together. when we first started talking about it, it was a way for a portfolio manager not to look dumb. this is what they're talking about in "the wall street journal" today. th
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. sponsored report gave a full endorsement that more liquid natural gas exports will help our economy and more shale oil and gas production will make us energy independent. question, will the epa keep its snout out of this great breakthrough energy process? here now to tell us is john hoffmeister. john, what's this take on the liquefied natural gas? i didn't even know there were constraints on their exports. >> well, the department of energy has to grant permits to economies that would seek to export natural gas. the study that came out was not an endorsement by the department energy, not yet. it was a third-party report analyzing the situation. it will now go into public discussion. the department of energy hasn't really taken a position yet opt report. but here's the reality. this is buried treasure, larry, this is buried treasure in this country, natural gas, i mean, that could be the stimulus that this economy has been loo
? >> absolutely. they want to build a reputation to find more patients to get educated and to learn about how to work using mobile devices with patients online. >> why would they do this for free? it's like a free sample. they basically help people, how they provide their service when they come to see them in the real world. so when someone has a question, they can squ a question and get an answer that can see them in the real world. >> i have a couple of thoughts that jump up on this about potential problems. first would be trying to diagnose someone over a mobile device. it seems like they could get in big trouble if they improperly diagnose them and second, every time i go to a doctor's office, they seem more than busy. it's hard as a regular patient to get squeezed into the time. so who are these doctors who have excess time on their hands. >> it's about education. it's about replacing all the information sites or messageboards that don't have doctors in them. they connect with the right doctors. we have -- >> these are u.s. licensed physicians in good standing. we actually check that the
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